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Fall 2013 Courses

 

COMM 2000-01: Introduction to Communication Studies.
Instructor: Dr. Curtis Coats.
MW 1-2:40 pm
An introduction to the processes of mediated communication through analysis of the production and consumption of communicative acts and media texts and through an analysis of meaning within those acts and texts.

COMM 3000-01: Faulkner, Film, and Social Justice.
Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster.
TTh 1:00-2:40 pm
We'll also consider the evolution of Faulkner's vision of social justice, especially when it comes to issues of race and class in Mississippi, over the course of his career:  How do Faulkner's allegiances to groups in Mississippi change as he watches the state move (and takes his fictional characters) through the nineteen-twenties, the thirties and forties and into the fifties?  While considering this question, we'll explore Faulkner's relation to Hollywood, viewing at least two of the films that he wrote screenplays for -- The Big Sleep and To Have and Have Not -- as well as at least two of the film adaptations of his novels, Intruder in the Dust (1948) and As I Lay Dying (to be released in June 2013). We'll read several of Faulkner's short stories and at least two of his full-length novels, at times comparing short stories to parts of these novels as a meaning of understanding Faulkner's creative process of building architectonic novels out of smaller units of fiction. And we'll compare the conservative stance Faulkner takes on integration in his Nobel Prize Address to the courageous stance on race that he takes in some of his best fiction. By exploring Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha, the fictional county that flows from story to story and novel to novel in his works, we'll also explore the culture in which he produced this fiction, Mississippi before Civil Rights.

COMM 3400-01: Studies in Intercultural Communication.
Instructor: Dr. Curtis Coats.
TTh 10-11:15 am
The specific content will vary, but this course will consider the relationship between communication and culture through study of communications within and between ethnic groups, social classes, and other communities. Topics could include communication between or within genders and racial/ethnic groups and ethnography and communicative environments. May be used to satisfy the historical/cultural/theoretical requirement for the major. Prerequisite: COMM 2000 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 4900-01: Senior Seminar in Communications.
Instructor: Dr. Curtis Coats.
TTh 1:00-2:40 pm
This course is designed to help senior Communications majors acquire more advanced skills and develop more advanced critical thinking in the field of communication studies. 

 

Fall 2013 Film Courses

Film 2750-01: Faulkner, Film, and Social Justice.
Instructor: Dr. Anne MacMaster.
TTh 1:00-2:40 pm

We'll also consider the evolution of Faulkner's vision of social justice, especially when it comes to issues of race and class in Mississippi, over the course of his career:  How do Faulkner's allegiances to groups in Mississippi change as he watches the state move (and takes his fictional characters) through the nineteen-twenties, the thirties and forties and into the fifties?  While considering this question, we'll explore Faulkner's relation to Hollywood, viewing at least two of the films that he wrote screenplays for -- The Big Sleep and To Have and Have Not -- as well as at least two of the film adaptations of his novels, Intruder in the Dust (1948) and As I Lay Dying (to be released in June 2013). We'll read several of Faulkner's short stories and at least two of his full-length novels, at times comparing short stories to parts of these novels as a meaning of understanding Faulkner's creative process of building architectonic novels out of smaller units of fiction. And we'll compare the conservative stance Faulkner takes on integration in his Nobel Prize Address to the courageous stance on race that he takes in some of his best fiction. By exploring Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha, the fictional county that flows from story to story and novel to novel in his works, we'll also explore the culture in which he produced this fiction, Mississippi before Civil Rights.